CONTEXT: March

MARCH: Gentrification 

Explore the impact that gentrification has had on community and cultural identity of Atlanta neighborhoods: what has been lost, what has been gained, and who has benefited from the urban revitalization of the City too Busy to Hate?    

 


 

March Events and Resources on Gentrification

Term of the Day Social Media Posts

Urban Displacement

Arts & Culture

Gentrification in Atlanta with Dr. Nia Reed

Combating Gentrification:  How You Can Get Involved with Tarnace Watkins, Jay Perlmutter, and Suzanne Burnes

Learn More about Gentrification in Atlanta

Additional Resources

 


Term of the Day Social Media Posts

Today’s term of the day is inline with our Context: Gentrification programming for the month.
 
Tell us where you’ve personally seen or experienced gentrification around the city. What are you thoughts on policies and tools that should be implemented to prevent housing un-affordability, inequities and continued displacement of vulnerable residents?

 


Urban Displacement

 

In our continued learning about gentrification it is important to also discuss one of the biggest impacts of it, urban displacement. Read more on urban displacement here.

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Mapping Displacement, Gentrification, and Exclusion in Atlanta
Access the Interactive Map at: https://www.urbandisplacement.org/atlanta/atlanta-gentrification-and-displacement. UDP collaborated with the Strong, Prosperous, and Resilient Communities Challenge (SPARCC) to assess local dynamics around gentrification, displacement, and exclusion in Atlanta, in close collaboration with local partners. We hope that the resulting map of our neighborhood change typology will empower Atlanta communities to better understand their trajectories and stabilize their resident population

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  1. Nearly half of all Atlanta neighborhoods experienced a rapid increase in housing costs (an increase above the regional median) between 2000 and 2017.
  2. Approximately 80,000 low-income Atlanta households (13% of all low-income households) live in low-income neighborhoods at risk of, or already experiencing, gentrification and/or displacement.
  3. As of 2017, half of Atlanta’s moderate-to-high-income neighborhoods demonstrated risk of or ongoing exclusion of lower-income households, a pattern especially prevalent on the northwest side of the city. 27% of Atlanta’s low-income households, or about 175,000 low-income households, live in these potentially or currently exclusive neighborhoods.
  4. 60% of Atlanta’s low-income households live in low- or moderate-to-high-income neighborhoods that are stable.
  5. 22% of lower-income neighborhoods in Atlanta were at risk of gentrification in 2017, and 7% were undergoing displacement of low-income households without gentrification.
  6. Of the 8% of all Atlanta neighborhoods that lost low-income households between 2000 and 2017, more than half were moderate-to-high-income neighborhoods, indicating a need to more carefully examine displacement in exclusive areas.
  7. The map illustrates a potential spatial relationship between neighborhood change and the BeltLine. As many as nine census tracts along the eastern position of the Beltline are classified as moderate and mixed-income areas “becoming exclusive” to low-income households. Meanwhile, lower-income, majority Black and Latinx areas along the BeltLine on the westside of Atlanta are experiencing increasing housing costs, gentrification, and displacement.

 


Arts & Culture

 

Arts & Culture

"Arts and culture are fundamental to providing a high quality of life and healthy, livable communities; they are a significant and  consistent part of building and sustaining a competitive economy; and they are especially suited for addressing challenges with creative, holistic solutions based on collaboration and community engagement"
-Atlanta Regional Commission

"Communities that reinforce arts and culture are “investing in an industry that supports jobs, generates government revenue, and is the cornerstone of tourism.”
-Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 Report

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Metro Atlanta is a region with a rich arts and cultural environment, exhibiting everything from cultural landmarks to world-class museums to small artist enclaves. Known as the “Gateway to the South,” the region has attracted a diversity of residents and businesses in the 21st century, enriching the arts and expanding on traditional cultural activities in the region.

The legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the region’s role in the civil rights movement contribute greatly to the culture and are often reflected in the local art. Despite this rich cultural backdrop, artist and arts organizations struggle in a state that ranks 49th in per capita state spending on the arts. In FY2018, the Georgia Legislature appropriated just 11 cents per capita to the spending that is lower than any other state except Kansas. By comparison, Alabama appropriated 99 cents per capita to its state arts council, Mississippi 53 cents, South Carolina 74 cents, and Florida $1.43.

The region also has no single arts service organization acting as convener, advocate, and marketing leader for arts, culture, and creative placemaking. This lack of a regional arts council can make it difficult for artists, organizations, and advocates to organize and act around important issues and initiatives. As a result, these stakeholders struggle to influence policy areas where arts and culture can have meaningful positive impact, including infrastructure design and planning, transportation planning, equity, and gentrification, to name a few.

-Atlanta Regional Commision

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Impact of Film Industry

"Atlanta's growing prominence as the "Hollywood of the South" is driving a rise in the city's wealth"

In 2008, then-governor Sonny Perdue signed a tax incentive with no expiration date for film productions. Productions exceeding $500,000, there's a 20% tax incentive and an extra 10% if a peach logo is featured in the credits.

The growth in wealth — and its spread to luxury real estate — is tied to Atlanta's booming industries

-Business Insider

 


Gentrification in Atlanta with Dr. Nia Reed
 

What is Gentrification? Is it good or bad? Does it occur outside the U.S.? These questions and more will be answered by Dr. Nia Reed this Friday at 3:30pm est. Dr. Reed, a Visiting Professor at Spelman, has extensively studied gentrification in Atlanta and focuses on public housing in a lot of her work. Currently, she teaches a course at Spelman entitled Gentrifying Atlanta, which assesses the process of gentrification in the Atlanta area, paying attention to recent demolitions of large-scale public housing.

If you are interested in viewing the presentation slides from this presentation, please check out this PDF created by Dr. Reed.

 


Combating Gentrification:  How You Can Get Involved with Tarnace Watkins, Jay Perlmutter, and Suzanne Burnes

 

 

Join us on March 17, from 11:00am-12:00pm for this month’s Context event that will center on Gentrification at the intersections of race and class in Atlanta. You will learn more about three organizations who are working in and around Atlanta and how you can get involved in their efforts. Our panelists include. Jay Perlmutter from Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership, Inc., Tarnace Watkins from Grove Park Foundation, and Suzanne Burnes from Partnership for Southern Equity. Register now!

This event is being sponsored by Black Lady Planners, Student Planning Association and Inclusion, Advocacy, and Support Programs from the Division of Student Life.

View the recording of the event below:

 

 


Learn More about Gentrification in Atlanta

 

 


Additional Resources

Organizations Represented on the Combating Gentrification Panel

 

Resources Posted in Chat during the Combating Gentrification Panel

 

Organizations/Resources Highlighted by Panelists during the Combating Gentrification Panel